Last week, the Florida Supreme Court put policyholders’ minds at ease in Sebo v. American Home Assurance Co. by overturning a lower appellate court’s decision holding that the concurrent cause doctrine had no place in Florida first-party property claims.

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Until the appellate court’s decision in 2013, Florida courts had routinely applied the concurrent cause doctrine in deciding whether a loss caused by two or more independent perils was covered under a property insurance policy. But that was turned on its head when the appellate court found the concurrent cause doctrine had no place in first-party insurance claims — regardless of whether the causes of loss were dependent or independent. Instead, the appellate court held the efficient proximate cause doctrine applied and remanded the case for a determination of the efficient cause of the loss.

So what are the concurrent cause and efficient proximate cause doctrines? How do these doctrines affect policyholders?
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One of the most misunderstood provisions in a Commercial General Liability policy is the first sentence, which provides that the insurance company promises to provide coverage for damages “because of” bodily injury or property damage. Many people, including seasoned insurance professionals, believe CGL policies merely provide coverage “for” bodily injury or property damage. We see this every day, including in motions filed by insurance companies.
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